Guide to Spotting Bad Science/ Crisis in Social Sciences

“Neurotypical” science: can results be trusted when social scientists are using research to climb the social pyramid?

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Many Psychology Findings Not as Strong as Claimed, Study Says

Brian Nosek: Reproducibility Project at the Center for Open Science. Dr. Nosek and his team led an attempt to replicate the findings of 100 social science studies. More than 60 of the studies did not hold up.

The past several years have been bruising ones for the credibility of the social sciences.

Now, a painstaking yearslong effort to reproduce 100 studies published in three leading psychology journals has found that more than half of the findings did not hold up when retested. The analysis was done by research psychologists, many of whom volunteered their time to double-check what they considered important work. Their conclusions, reported Thursday in the journal Science, have confirmed the worst fears of scientists who have long worried that the field needed a strong correction.

___________Remember: These are the people defining and diagnosing (inventing) Autism, Asperger’s and other “social disorders.”

The vetted studies were considered part of the core knowledge by which scientists understand the dynamics of personality, relationships, learning and memory. Therapists and educators rely on such findings to help guide decisions, and the fact that so many of the studies were called into question could sow doubt in the scientific underpinnings of their work.

Dr. John Ioannidis, a director of Stanford University’s Meta-Research Innovation Center, who once estimated that about half of published results across medicine were inflated or wrong, noted the proportion in psychology was even larger than he had thought. He said the problem could be even worse in other fields, including cell biology, economics, neuroscience, clinical medicine, and animal research.

The report appears at a time when the number of retractions of published papers is rising sharply in a wide variety of disciplines. Scientists have pointed to a hypercompetitive culture across science that favors novel, sexy results and provides little incentive for researchers to replicate the findings of others, or for journals to publish studies that fail to find a splashy result.

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http://www.compoundchem.com

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